Archive for the 'Gluten free' Category

Tofu Fried Rice with Kale and Mushrooms

Hi there again – as you probably noticed, I am not blogging as frequently as I used to and it is mostly due to the incredibly slow internet speed and the nonexistence of wordpress in China. I have to use a way to get around that, which makes the process even slower and uploading pictures an incredibly frustrating process. Nevertheless, I am committed to this blog and I still love it.

I have hired a new Ayi (domestic help) who has the reputation of being an excellent cook and I hope I’ll learn a lot from her. She won’t start until August, so you’ll have to wait with me until then.

We went on a week long holiday to our former home, Thailand, and I took lots of pictures at my favorite market. I’ll hold on to those until I find a place with faster internet, which might not be until our summer holiday. I also finally completed a 21-day-Clean-detox and feel great. Some of you might remember my first attempt in August 2010, which I cut short after 14 days and fell into an omnivorous food binge. Luckily that didn’t happen this time around and I feel refreshed, healthy and definitely lighter.

So what can you expect in the weeks to come? An all time favorite lentil soup recipe,  miso soup with mushrooms and soba, my wonderfully gratifying sourdough bread experience and today this fried rice recipe, which I make all the time. I am surprised it hasn’t made it onto the blog until today. Here we go…

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Chickpea and Brown Rice Patties

Turns out, my second organic chicken purchase here in Beijing hasn’t worked out as planned either. I butterflied and roasted it, but the meat was super tough and not worth the effort. The chicken had hardly any breast and very skinny thighs, although the cavity was very fatty and loaded with unpleasant remains, so needless to say, I decided I’d rather eat beans and tofu for the rest of my time here than try that again.

I made these chickpea and brown rice patties the next night and they were delicious and much more gratifying. I found the recipe in the latest “Whole Living” magazine and adapted is slightly. They were not as dense as some other veggie burgers I have made, and the uncooked consistency was a little like mashed potatoes, despite me adding more rice to the food processor as the original recipe called for.  The patties turned out crisp on the outside and soft on the inside and held their shape very well. Nothing worse than when they fall apart in the pan and you end up turning them into one huge pancake.

I fried up one onion and carrot with a few cloves of garlic, before adding them to the food processor. You can also add them in their raw state, but I prefer the cooked flavor and texture. I added 3 cups of cooked chickpeas (2 cans, rinsed and drained), 3 cups of cooked brown rice, 1/2 cup coriander, thick stems removed, 2 eggs (you might want to start with one and add the second one if needed), salt and pepper and whizzed it all into a thick paste. Rather than forming patties with my hands, I heaped the batter in large spoonfulls into the hot frying pan and flattened and shaped them after turning them over.

The recipe in the magazine asks for mashing the ingredients together, which will give you a chunkier patti. You’ll need less brown rice, mince the coriander first, and use a bit of elbow grease.

I’ll be making those again soon, they were such a hit with the gang and go with just about everything.

Anyway, here is the recipe.

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Sesame Kale Chips

Here is my first post from China, and I am sorry that it is a recipe you can come across very easily nowadays and that it is not even remotly related to Chinese food. I made it just before leaving Massachusetts and probably won’t make it until we go back for our next holiday. Kale, or at least the types of kale we’re used to, isn’t available here or perhaps I haven’t found it yet. I did however find some local organic farms, which I will visit next week. Very exciting, especially in the dead of winter.

Our luggage full of food got through customs without so much as a glance – a huge relief, as it was loaded with plenty of treasures from Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s. Now we just need to be as lucky with our Australian biodynamic olive oil, spices and bottles of wine hidden deep inside our moving boxes in our container, still out at sea.

In the few days we have been here, we had amazing Peking Duck at the very famous “Dadong” restaurant and very mediocre noodles. The kids had a great time spotting “unusual” ingredients on the menus, such as sea cucumber intestines, bullfrog, turtle, donkey, innards of every kind, soya pigeon, etc. I am planning to take my camera along to future restaurant and market visits and let you know what I found. I started checking out grocery stores and supermarkets that sell everything from electronics, to underwear to milk all the way from Germany. I found a few very sad looking organic vegetables, which were harvested long before Chinese New Year, and organic chicken and pork. The chicken still has its head and feet attached, which will be interesting when it comes to preparing dinner tonight. I had the choice between spring chicken, hen and rooster. I went for the hen, but it felt almost a bit too real. No doubt we will be well fed during this adventure here, hopefully without too much dog or donkey meat thrown into the mix.

Go make some kale chips now! It’s so easy and quick and a delicious snack which is loved by all. I am jealous already…

Ingredients

1 bunch of kale (any other than cavolo nero, also known as tuscan or lacinato kale, will be good)

1/4 cup sesame seeds

3 tablespoons olive oil

sprinkle of salt

Method

Preheat oven to 200F (100C) convection heat, or 225 regular heat.

Wash and dry kale. Take a leaf into one hand and use the other hand to tear off the leafy part, starting at the thick end of the stem and moving all the way to the top of the leaf. Tear the stemless leaves into roughly 2×2 inch size pieces and put in a large bowl. Repeat with other leaves.

Drizzle kale with olive oil, sprinkle with sesame seeds and salt. Mix well.

Place kale in single layer on parchment lined baking tray and bake for 25 minutes, turning kale over half way through. If some of the kale hasn’t turned crispy after 25 minutes, bake for a few more minutes.

Eat straight away, or store in air tight container for a 2-3 days.

 

Prep Work

I was tired yesterday and the only thing I wanted to do, other than sleeping, was to cook or bake something. Sleeping wasn’t an option. All three kids were at home with me and my husband was sitting on an airplane to Beijing. The kids were tired too, and in need for entertainment, so I asked them to bake the cookies while I prepare dinner. I got a bit carried away after a long stare into the refrigerator. I had been on a bit of a food shopping binge lately and there were more vegetables in my fridge than we would ever be able to eat. I decided to prep and cook them in order to speed up and facilitate our dinner preparation this week. So out came the cauliflower, broccoli, beets, pumpkin, squash, parsnips, chard, kale and mushrooms. With the oven already on, I quickly turned the kale into sesame kale chips (recipe later this week), while I chopped and sliced the rest. The sugar pumpkin, was cut into 1 inch cubes for roasting, while the squash was halved, deseeded and roasted cut side down. I scrubbed the beets, drizzled them with oil and put them into a small roasting pan, covered with aluminium foil. I cut the parsnips into 1/2 inch x 2 inch sticks, drizzled more olive oil over them and found the last free spot for them inside the oven.

I am not sure if you ever roasted your cauliflower (it took me 10 + years of steaming, before switching over), but now I don’t want to eat it any other way anymore. I remove all leaves and the thick middle stalk from the cauliflower, place it on a cutting board, stem side down, and slice it between 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick. I break apart the slices to get bite size pieces and place them in a bowl, together with 1 teaspoon turmeric, salt and freshly ground pepper and yet again, olive oil. Everything gets a good mix in the bowl, before I spread it on a single layer on a parchment lined baking sheet. Roasting time is 20-30 minutes on 375 F (190C), or until the edges start to turn brown.

While my oven was going at full speed, I cut the mushrooms into quarters, minced 4 cloves of garlic, removed the thick stems of the chard and cut it into 1 inch slices. In a large pan, I sauteed the garlic first in some olive oil, added the mushrooms and a tiny bit of white wine, salt and pepper and cooked everything until tender, less than 10 minutes. I removed the mushrooms from the pan, careful to leave some of the garlic behind, and added the chard and a little more white wine. I put the lid on and cooked the greens until just wilted, less than 5 minutes. After a bit of seasoning and a good stir, I removed the chard from the pan into a bowl.

The beets were done after about one hour and I peeled the skin right off them once they had cooled down a bit. I scraped the flesh out of the acorn squash and put it into a bowl ready for a quick soup or risotto. Here is a picture of the beets and everything else.

All of this didn’t take me more than a couple of hours and with the result, we are set for a range of delicious meals in the coming days. I had cooked a pot full of chickpeas as well, so we didn’t need to go protein free.

Yesterday night we had this:

I sauteed a diced onion, added some of the roasted pumpkin pieces, half of the mushrooms and chard, a few handfuls of chickpeas, a little white wine and chicken stock. I ate mine with left over rice, while the kids had theirs with pasta and a good bit of parmesan sprinkled over it. Yum!

Today, we had pumpkin soup with ginger and coconut milk. Tomorrow it’ll be beets with goats cheese for lunch, roast vegetable pizza for dinner and frittata on Thursday. The rest of the chickpeas will either be turned into hummus with the remaining pumpkin thrown right in or I’ll make my beloved pumpkin and chickpea salad. One thing I didn’t do was caramelizing a few onions, which would have been another great addition to any of those meals. Next time!

 

Yellow Split Pea Dal

My favorite meal this winter here in Australia has been dal. Every time we go out for Indian food, I order one of their dals and lately I have started to cook my own. So far I have made a Chana Dal and this Split Pea Dal. Both turned out wonderfully flavorful and deliciously satisfying. They are quick to make, very economical and left-overs are easily frozen and re-heated in a pinch. I have ordered an Indian vegetarian cookbook online, so expect more fantastic Indian food soon.

The main ingredients here are yellow split peas, which are loaded with fiber and protein, and a range of aromatic spices and vegetables which add a depth of flavor. All are easy to get and make excellent pantry/fridge staples. If you haven’t cooked with ghee before, try it out. It is clarified butter, a staple of Indian cooking and highly regarded for it’s healing properties in Ayurvedic medicine. Ghee keeps well in the fridge. Use olive oil instead, if you are cooking dairy free.

This recipe makes a large pot of food and fed the 5 of us on two nights. You can easily use only half of the ingredients or save the rest for another night.

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Kicking Carrot Soup

I am back, albeit only for 2 posts, before I am heading on a 4 week holiday to 4 countries. Crazy I know, but hopefully this way we’ll be able to catch up with as many relatives and friends as possible plus see some beautiful sites and eat delicious food all at once.

Since I am still in my pyjamas in the midst of the pre-holiday packing chaos,  I’ll make this short and just share a couple of recipes from my recent cooking classes. The carrot soup is simple and tasty. It gets it’s kick from the ginger and a hint of citrus from freshly squeezed orange juice. The color is magnificent and makes this soup quite appealing to small children.  

I’ll take lots of pictures on our vacation and will share some of our adventures when we get back in a month. Be well and enjoy the summer or winter, depending which side of the planet you’re on.

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Watercress with Orange, Grapefruit, Persimmon, Pomegranate, Hazelnuts and fresh Goats Cheese

Last December, the day after a gigantic blizzard blanketed most of the north eastern United States with tons of snow and caused major traffic and air travel delays, I was scheduled to attend a cooking class at the Institute of Culinary Education in New York City. With a maximum speed of 30 mph, I drove myself into the city, braving slippery roads, gusty winds and minimal visibility. The drive that normally takes two and a half hours took almost twice as long. My family thought I was crazy, but I had my mind set to it and the thought of a few days in the city all by myself was just too tempting. I had bought myself a last minute Broadway ticket to make the most of my evening, parked the car right outside the theater, knowing policemen had other things on their mind, and enjoyed the show. Arriving at my hotel, with a lobby full of tourists desperate for a place to stay, I soon found out that the cooking class for the next morning was canceled.

What is a girl to do in New York City with all this free time? Well the holiday sales were in full swing and I dove right in. I needed a new pair of skinny jeans, not an easy feat right after a week of gluttony. I must have tried on every single pair and finally out of shear desperation, bought one that was promptly returned when upon inspection a few days later, both my husband and oldest son made comments that included hips and shapely behind.

Like every year, the highlight was the Crate & Barel post holiday sale, were I filled my bags with all things Christmas. For the rest of the day, I wandered around, marveling at my favorite city completely covered in snow and looking forward to my dinner at COOKSHOP

I had the most lovely evening at this beautiful “farm-to table” restaurant in Chelsea. Not surprisingly it wasn’t busy and I had a quiet table with just enough candle light to decipher the articles in my magazine. I ordered a salad of watercress, oranges, tangerines, grapefruit, persimmon, pomegranate and buffalo ricotta for starters and duck crepes for mains. Both were delicious, but the salad was truly spectacular and I have dreamed of making it ever since. A few days ago, with all the right ingredients finally in season here in Australia, I recreated it to the best of my memory and it was just like I remembered it. Beautiful, unusual and delicious!

I hope you’ll enjoy it just as much as I did.

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Pumpkin Crème Brûlée

This is a really lovely dessert I have made several times during the past few weeks. It is a breeze to make and tastes delicious. The hint of spices, beautiful creamy texture and mild pumpkin flavor make it the perfect dessert for a holiday meal or a dinner party. My favorite part is that I can make this a day or two ahead and not worry about it again until everyone has finished their main course. I just take it out of the fridge, fire up my blow torch and within minutes it’s ready.

I like to serve it in 1/2 cup ramekins, which is just the right amount of dessert after a big meal. The first recipe I followed used larger cups and less eggs, therefore increasing the cooking time in the water bath to more than an hour. Although I only had my 1/2 cup ramekins, I didn’t expect there would be a great difference in cooking time. Oh, how wrong I was. I thought I had plenty of time to pick my kids up from school before returning to a perfect dessert. So upon opening the oven door about an hour later, my beautiful crème brûlées had turned into a wrinkly and solid and completely uneatable version of what they should have been. Lesson learned –  check the size of your ramekins and adjust accordingly. And after about 30 minutes of cooking time, check your custards and give them a little shake. They are ready when they still have a slight wiggle in the center.

Another near mishap occurred when we made this crème brûlée in one of my “cooking get-togethers”. We accidentally used 2 instead of 1 cups of pumpkin puree, with the same amount of sugar, eggs and cream. It still turned out wonderful, just a bit more pumpkiny and took a few minutes longer to set. The recipe below asks for only one cup of pumpkin puree for 2 cups of cream, but if you like a stronger pumpkin flavor, go ahead and use more. Continue reading ‘Pumpkin Crème Brûlée’

Chicken and Pumpkin Curry

This is a version of my favorite go to curry recipe. The base is so versatile and can be used with fish. shrimp, tofu, beans and yes, chicken. It comes together easily and if you are a quick chopper, will be ready in no time. What makes this taste so good are a few essential ingredients – fresh garlic, ginger, lemongrass, Indian curry powder, coconut milk and coriander (cilantro). For the rest you can add what is already in your fridge or freezer. I try to use many different colored vegetables and herbs, which make this meal just as appealing to the eye as to your stomach.

Bear in mind the different cooking times for the vegetables, particularly if using pumpkin. I added it to the pan roughly 10 minutes before the remaining vegetables. Zucchini usually goes in at the end, as it quickly looses its texture and color. 

As to the chicken, here’s a tip that you might or might not know yet. If you cut the chicken breasts into bite size pieces and marinate them in buttermilk for a couple of hours in the fridge, the meat won’t turn tough and dry during the cooking process. It makes such a difference in texture. I can’t stand dry chicken breast and this is what I do to avoid it. Another option is to use a marinade of lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper, especially if you want to cook a whole breast in one piece. If you want to keep this recipe dairy-free, omit the buttermilk, or make your own using 1 cup soy milk and 1 tablespoon lemon juice or try the lemon juice and olive oil marinade.

You can make this as spicy as you like. I add a chili if I have one, otherwise  a bit more curry powder or cayenne pepper can spice things up. Here’s one last tip for cooking lemongrass. Only the lower 5-6″ (12-15cm) are soft enough to be eaten once you have removed the tough, outer husks. Slice the light green sticks into very thin rounds and then mince. You want them to be as fine as possible, otherwise they might not soften in the pan and you’ll end up with some chewy lemongrass bits in your curry. Use the left-over husks to make delicious lemon grass tea. Add the ginger peel as well, if you like.   Continue reading ‘Chicken and Pumpkin Curry’

Quinoa Stuffed Bell Peppers and Eggplant

The temperatures are still on the warm side at the moment and the markets full of peppers, eggplant and zucchini. So although I am way over summer, I cook what’s in season and continue to experiment with summer veggies. The other day, I remembered a favorite dish from years back – stuffed peppers with ground beef- and decided to try a new less meaty version with quinoa. I scooped out 5 peppers, an eggplant and a left over zucchini half, chopped up the flesh and sauteed it with chili, onion and garlic. I added another zucchini, a can of whole tomatoes, a can of black beans and some fresh herbs, mixed it with the cooked quinoa and stuffed the mixture into the vegetables. Before it all went in the oven to bake for 30 minutes, I topped it up with slices of mozzarella.

Fresh tomatoes would be at least as good, but the organic ones are increasingly hard to get and therefore I went with the canned version. I didn’t use any of the tomato juice left in the can, because I didn’t want my stuffing to get too wet. See how you go, you can always add it towards the end if you feel like you need extra moisture. As for the cheese topping, any cheese you like will be fine, I just happened to have some mozzarella open. If you don’t like any cheese at all, you can easily make this recipe without or sprinkle some chopped toasted nuts over the finished dish.

In case you want to stuff bell peppers only, peel the eggplant the recipe is asking for, chop it up and saute it with the onions, garlic and chili.  This recipe also works with zucchinis. The only downside there is that they flatten out quite a bit when stuffed and baked.

And just to let you know, the vegetarian version was even better than the meaty one I had been thinking about.

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